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  • Rigging & Splicing
    Rigging comprises the system of ropes, cables and chains, which support a sailing ship or sail boat's masts—standing rigging, including shrouds and stays—and which adjust the position of the vessel's sails and spars to which they are attached—the running rigging, including halyards, braces, sheets and vangs. In recreational marine, rigging a boat is to accommodate the different physiques and styles of rowing of the crew in such a way that the oars move in similar arcs through the water, thus improving the crew's efficiency and cohesiveness. Keywords: Boats, Riggers, Rig Shop, Boat Rigging, Recreational Marine, Marine Products, Boat Supplies, Sail boat supplies, Kevlar, Dyneema, Vectran, Spectra, Innegra, Dacron
  • Sail Making & Repair
    Sail components include the features that define a sail's shape and function, plus its constituent parts from which it is manufactured. A sail may be classified in a variety of ways, including by its orientation to the vessel (e.g. fore-and-aft) and its shape, (e.g. (a)symmetrical, triangular, quadrilateral, etc.). Sails are typically constructed out of flexible material that is shaped by various means, while in use, to offer an appropriate airfoil, according to the strength and apparent direction of the wind. A variety of features and fittings allow the sail to be attached to lines and spars. Sails are constructed of fabrics that may be woven or manufactured as films. The sail are often assembled of multiple panels that are arrayed in a manner that transfers the load from the wind to the sail's attachment points—a combination of corners and edges—that transmits the load into the mast and powers the boat. Construction of such sails requires stitching, bonding, reinforcements and other features to achieve this. Other sails are constructed directly from fibers, filaments and films. Traditionally, sails were made from flax or cotton canvas. Materials used in sails, as of the 21st Century, include nylon for spinnakers—where light weight and elastic resistance to shock load are valued—and a range of fibers, used for triangular sails, that includes Dacron, aramid fibers—including Kevlar, and other liquid crystal polymer fibers—including Vectran. [Source: wikipedia] Keywords: Boats, Sails, Sailmaker, Sailmaking, Sail shop, Sail loft, Recreational Marine, Marine Products, Boat Supplies, Sail boat supplies, sailcloth, Kevlar, Vectran, Spectra, Innegra, Dacron, Canvas
  • Sailcloth Manufacturing
    Sail components include the features that define a sail's shape and function, plus its constituent parts from which it is manufactured. A sail may be classified in a variety of ways, including by its orientation to the vessel (e.g. fore-and-aft) and its shape, (e.g. (a)symmetrical, triangular, quadrilateral, etc.). Sails are typically constructed out of flexible material that is shaped by various means, while in use, to offer an appropriate airfoil, according to the strength and apparent direction of the wind. A variety of features and fittings allow the sail to be attached to lines and spars. Sails are constructed of fabrics that may be woven or manufactured as films. The sail are often assembled of multiple panels that are arrayed in a manner that transfers the load from the wind to the sail's attachment points—a combination of corners and edges—that transmits the load into the mast and powers the boat. Construction of such sails requires stitching, bonding, reinforcements and other features to achieve this. Other sails are constructed directly from fibers, filaments and films. Traditionally, sails were made from flax or cotton canvas. Materials used in sails, as of the 21st Century, include nylon for spinnakers—where light weight and elastic resistance to shock load are valued—and a range of fibers, used for triangular sails, that includes Dacron, aramid fibers—including Kevlar, and other liquid crystal polymer fibers—including Vectran. [Source: wikipedia] Keywords: Boats, Sails, Sailmaker, Sailmaking, Sail shop, Sail loft, Recreational Marine, Marine Products, Boat Supplies, Sail boat supplies, sailcloth, Kevlar, Vectran, Spectra, Innegra, Dacron, Canvas
  • Fiber Optic Cable Splicing
    An optical fiber or optical fiber is a flexible, transparent fiber made by drawing glass (silica) or plastic to a diameter slightly thicker than that of a human hair.[1] Optical fibers are used most often as a means to transmit light between the two ends of the fiber and find wide usage in fiber-optic communications, where they permit transmission over longer distances and at higher bandwidths (data rates) than electrical cables. Optical fibers typically include a core surrounded by a transparent cladding material with a lower index of refraction. Light is kept in the core by the phenomenon of total internal reflection which causes the fiber to act as a waveguide. Fibers that support many propagation paths or transverse modes are called multi-mode fibers (MMF), while those that support a single mode are called single-mode fibers (SMF). Modern cables come in a wide variety of sheathings and armor designed for variety of applications. Some fiber optic cable versions are reinforced with aramid yarns (Kevlar) or glass yarns as intermediary strength member. Optical fibers are connected to terminal equipment by optical fiber connectors which involves splicing. The Kevlar strengthener needs to have a clean cut for termination. Our shears are just right for the job.